Untitled photo
Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo
  • Untitled photo

One of the last great migrations in North America, only rivaled by the Monarch Butterfly. Hundreds of thousands of Sandhill Cranes migrate from their summer breeding grounds in the upper Midwest and Canada to their winter grounds in the south.


The majority of the birds in North America migrate along the Mississippi Flyway, but there is a smaller population that travel from upper Indiana to Florida.


For few weeks during the fall migration it is common to see tens of thousands of cranes gathering in the corn fields and wetlands of Indiana before continuing their southerly migration.


Since the early 2000s, the Sandhill crane has expanded their range northward, parts of the Midwest has seen an extensive rebound in Sandhill Crane numbers making it one of the most successful bird species in North America with a population of almost 1,000,000.


Sandhill cranes are the second tallest bird in North America, adults are about 5’ tall with wingspans of almost 8’.


These cranes are very charismatic and social birds. They  live in pairs or family groups through the year, but during migration, unrelated cranes come together to form flocks called "survival groups". These groups roost together in the wetlands where their frequent trumpeting call can be heard from very long distances. Quite often they can be heard long before you can see them.


During the day the groups scatter through the surrounding corn fields to forage, before returning to the wetland areas to roost and engage in elaborate greetings and dancing behavior.


Although Sandhill cranes can be seen throughout Indiana during the fall and winter, there are two locations with consistently large gatherings.


Jasper Pulasky Fish and Wildlife Area is located about 40 miles south of Gary Indiana. Cranes gather there in significant numbers from late November through December.

Jasper Pulaski fish and Wildlife Area

Ewing Bottoms is a low area just north of the East Fork of the White River near Ewing and Brownstown, Indiana. The bottoms are all private property so if you visit please stay on the roads to view the birds.